Belated harvest post

It’s taken a few days to put this entry together, not for any inherent difficulty. Simply, I got sick. A triad of feverish nights and not kinder, gentler, or prettier for the result, we can now go to post.

The Rushing-Wade method of lawn management can be overdone. After removing the spirea in the front yard, we let the grass grow up and go to seed. Only thing, we sorta over-waited to cut it. The perfect time is when the stalks are still green, thick and moist, but the seeds can be gently rubbed off the heads. When stalks start to look like straw, the seeds are still good but the grass may be harmed by cutting. Here’s what the bad looks like:

FrontYardGrowGrassMower

Note also the brown patches in the cut grass

The net result will do. Compare:

BillWithMattock

Big patch, no grass

With:

GrassFormerlySpirea

Big patch, yea grass

The little purple-pink flowers in the foreground are Oxalis. Most urbanites call them wood sorrell and treat them as weeds. Of course, we are all about contrary at 118 Henry Street. We let them grow in many places and have even transplanted them into the flowerbeds. A big part of their beauty is if you don’t like’em, mow ‘em. If you like’em, mow around them to get beautiful little flowers.

OxalisViolet

Most of our Oxalis is the violet variety

But we do have one patch of white.

OxalisWhite

Volunteer in the flower bed

If you can’t poison, prod, or kill it out of your yard, change it’s name and send it our way. We’ll find a place. It’s also good to chew.

With the front yard cleaned up and the first of a few days spent gathering leaves, things looked pretty good.

DeShawnFrontYardFall2009

Autumn afternoon

Last post, we had a surprisingly strong, positive reaction to the “Aww…” picture. So here is the counterbalance, just so the universe stays straight on course.

UnholyAllianceForVent

Unholy alliance for vent heat